Link

gwenlightened:

Insanity is a workout/weight-loss program. It’s 63 days of cardio madness that will lead you to love the instructor, as well as hate him, all at the same time.

It’s led by fitness provocateur, Shaun T, who takes you through 14 different videos designed to burn fat and…

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Photoset

173-to-127:

operation-hourglass:

Jen Selter ~ Building that amazing booty!

Fitness blog :)

(Source: fitnessgifs4u)

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crazysexyfierce:

fitness-forever:

20 THINGS THAT ARE KEEPING YOU OVERWEIGHT 
Even if you’ve kicked off a fitness routine and you’re choosing healthier food, you may not be seeing the weight come off the way you’d hoped. While there are plenty of other healthy accomplishments to celebrate, you’re probably wondering what’s not working. One or a few of these 20 weight-loss culprits may be all that’s standing in the way of your weight-loss goals. 
You Overeat Healthy Foods
Nuts, avocados, whole wheat pasta, olive oil, and dark chocolate are all natural and healthy, but they aren’t void of calories. You still need to watch how much you eat of the good stuff. For example, avocado offers a ton of health benefits, but an entire fruit is over 200 calories. Find out what the serving sizes of your other favorite healthy foods are here.
You Don’t Eat Breakfast
Skipping breakfast may seem like a great way to save calories, but your body will actually hold onto fat because it thinks it’s being starved. Keep in mind that people who eat breakfast regularly lose more weight, so make sure to eat breakfast each morning to jump-start your metabolism. Don’t just grab anything; include protein to give yourself sustainable energy and fiber to fill you up for hours.
You Don’t Practice Portion Control
When it comes to a balanced diet, we know that portion control is one of the keys to success. Keep measuring cups and spoons on hand to make sure your serving sizes are appropriate, and learn how to give your body the “I’m full” signal in order to help you drop the fork when the time is right and move on with your day.
You Eat While Standing Up
Standing at the fridge or the counter to chow down isn’t saving time or energy and can lead to mindless eating. It’s best to designate time for snacking and meals that’s set apart from other activities.
You Don’t Sleep Enough
Making time for your workouts can mean less time for sleep, but it’s important to get enough Z’s if you’re trying to lose weight. You need extra energy to keep up with your exercise routine, and skimping on sleep can affect your body’s ability to control its appetite: not enough shut-eye increases appetite-stimulating hormones.
You Overindulge in Low-Fat Foods
Going for foods with a lower calorie count can be deceiving, since many times they’re filled with extra sodium, sugar, or chemical additives to make up for the ingredients the company has removed or decreased. Not only are these light versions less nutritious, but they also end up tasting “lighter,” leading you to eat more. You’ll probably end up consuming more calories than you would if you just ate a regular-sized portion of the real thing.
You Don’t Get Enough Veggies
Eating five to seven servings of fruits and veggies a day is important for everyone, but dieters who go heavy on the produce are more likely to lose and keep the weight off, since a diet full of plant-based foods offers a greater variety of nutrients with fewer calories — and all that fiber keeps the body feeling fuller longer.
You Think Walking Your Dog Is Enough
A 15-minute stroll is better than nothing, but don’t expect to see dramatic weight-loss results. You’ve got to kick it up a notch — big time — and do at least 30 minutes a day of heart-pumping exercise. Big calorie and fat burners include running, spin class, interval training, hiking, and circuit training.
You Don’t Cut Your Food
Something as simple as slicing up your dinner can be helpful for your overeating woes. Cutting food into tiny pieces may seem slightly childish, but studies show that humans find smaller portions more satisfying and, as a result, are satisfied with less.
You Still Drink Soda
Soda offers literally no nutritional benefits, and continuing to drink the beverage is sabotaging your weight-loss goals — even if you only drink diet. Studies have shown that individuals who drink two diet sodas a day or more had waistlines that were500 percent larger than the nondrinkers. Since quitting soda is no joke, check out this 28-day plan for breaking a cola habit.
You’re Addicted to Condiments and Toppings
A salad is one of the healthiest meals you can have, but when you top it with bacon bits, goat cheese, nuts, dried fruits, and ranch dressing, you can double the calorie amount in a flash. Be aware of how many calories your favorite salad extras add on. For instance, 10 croutons is an easy 100 calories.
You Don’t Drink Water
Besides keeping you hydrated, drinking water on the regular, according to recent studies, can aid with weight loss. Filling up on water before a meal helps encourage portion control, and eating foods that contain a lot of water (like fruits and veggies) will fill you up faster, causing you to eat less. A small study even found that drinking cool water can speed up metabolism and discourage cravings for sugary drinks like soda and juice. Now, that’s a reason to stay hydrated!
You Don’t Leave Time For Fun
Since stress is shown to cause weight gain by triggering the body to eat more — especially foods high in sugar and fat — make sure you give yourself time to relax and unwind. And it’s an added bonus that so many fun activities (like dancing, hiking, and shopping) are already natural calorie-burners!
You Exercise With an Empty Stomach
If you regularly exercise without eating first, you should reconsider: when you work out on an empty stomach, research shows that the calories burned come from muscle, not fat. Since muscle burns more calories than fat, the more muscle mass you have, the better it is for weight loss. Not only will fueling your body help you avoid losing muscle, but also, you’ll have more energy to push yourself through your workout.
You Only Do Cardio
If you live on the treadmill but never lift a pound, then you’re missing out on one of the most important pieces of the fitness puzzle. Not only does weight training prevent injury by strengthening the joints, but it also builds muscle mass and increases metabolic rate. Bonus: thanks to a revved-up metabolism, you’ll keep burning calories long after you’ve slipped off your sneakers.
You Eat Without Thinking
Aligning mealtime with a screen like your computer or the TV can be hurt your weight-loss goals. Designating a special time for meals without distractions will help you connect to your food and, as a result, eat less. Sometimes you don’t even realize how much you’re scarfing when your mind is somewhere else.
You Don’t Eat Enough
Don’t starve yourself to save calories for later. It’ll not only mess up your metabolism, and by dinnertime, that famished feeling will likely cause you to eat more than you would if you weren’t starving. Not only is starving yourself not sustainable for continued weight loss, but also, limiting yourself to too-small portions can lead to excess snacking between mealtimes.
You Leave Out Entire Food Groups
Giving up entire food groups can lead to a nutritional deficiency — not to mention trigger major cravings for whatever food has been cut. Rather than, say, eliminating all carbohydrates, focus on whole grains and remember to monitor portion control. Usually it’s the extra servings that add to your waistline, not the pasta itself.
You Never Indulge
In an otherwise healthy diet, eating a few french fries or a piece of chocolate cake isn’t going to ruin your weight-loss goals. A study found that it isn’t necessary to up workout intensity the day after a piece of cake and that a daily variance of as much as 600 calories won’t reflect on your waistline, as long as you maintain a healthy diet in the long run.
You Eat the Wrong Post-Workout Snacks
A post-workout snack is just that — a snack. And unless it’s mealtime, what you eat after an average workout should be around 150 calories. Since healthy foods like trail mix can be high in calories, measure out a serving instead of mindlessly chomping straight out of the bag. If you’re looking for some ideas, here are 10 post-workout snacks under 150 calories
Source: Fitsugar

Love this. No bull, just straight facts!

crazysexyfierce:

fitness-forever:

20 THINGS THAT ARE KEEPING YOU OVERWEIGHT 

Even if you’ve kicked off a fitness routine and you’re choosing healthier food, you may not be seeing the weight come off the way you’d hoped. While there are plenty of other healthy accomplishments to celebrate, you’re probably wondering what’s not working. One or a few of these 20 weight-loss culprits may be all that’s standing in the way of your weight-loss goals. 

You Overeat Healthy Foods

Nuts, avocados, whole wheat pasta, olive oil, and dark chocolate are all natural and healthy, but they aren’t void of calories. You still need to watch how much you eat of the good stuff. For example, avocado offers a ton of health benefits, but an entire fruit is over 200 calories. Find out what the serving sizes of your other favorite healthy foods are here.

You Don’t Eat Breakfast

Skipping breakfast may seem like a great way to save calories, but your body will actually hold onto fat because it thinks it’s being starved. Keep in mind that people who eat breakfast regularly lose more weight, so make sure to eat breakfast each morning to jump-start your metabolism. Don’t just grab anything; include protein to give yourself sustainable energy and fiber to fill you up for hours.

You Don’t Practice Portion Control

When it comes to a balanced diet, we know that portion control is one of the keys to success. Keep measuring cups and spoons on hand to make sure your serving sizes are appropriate, and learn how to give your body the “I’m full” signal in order to help you drop the fork when the time is right and move on with your day.

You Eat While Standing Up

Standing at the fridge or the counter to chow down isn’t saving time or energy and can lead to mindless eating. It’s best to designate time for snacking and meals that’s set apart from other activities.

You Don’t Sleep Enough

Making time for your workouts can mean less time for sleep, but it’s important to get enough Z’s if you’re trying to lose weight. You need extra energy to keep up with your exercise routine, and skimping on sleep can affect your body’s ability to control its appetite: not enough shut-eye increases appetite-stimulating hormones.

You Overindulge in Low-Fat Foods

Going for foods with a lower calorie count can be deceiving, since many times they’re filled with extra sodium, sugar, or chemical additives to make up for the ingredients the company has removed or decreased. Not only are these light versions less nutritious, but they also end up tasting “lighter,” leading you to eat more. You’ll probably end up consuming more calories than you would if you just ate a regular-sized portion of the real thing.

You Don’t Get Enough Veggies

Eating five to seven servings of fruits and veggies a day is important for everyone, but dieters who go heavy on the produce are more likely to lose and keep the weight off, since a diet full of plant-based foods offers a greater variety of nutrients with fewer calories — and all that fiber keeps the body feeling fuller longer.

You Think Walking Your Dog Is Enough

A 15-minute stroll is better than nothing, but don’t expect to see dramatic weight-loss results. You’ve got to kick it up a notch — big time — and do at least 30 minutes a day of heart-pumping exercise. Big calorie and fat burners include running, spin class, interval training, hiking, and circuit training.

You Don’t Cut Your Food

Something as simple as slicing up your dinner can be helpful for your overeating woes. Cutting food into tiny pieces may seem slightly childish, but studies show that humans find smaller portions more satisfying and, as a result, are satisfied with less.

You Still Drink Soda

Soda offers literally no nutritional benefits, and continuing to drink the beverage is sabotaging your weight-loss goals — even if you only drink diet. Studies have shown that individuals who drink two diet sodas a day or more had waistlines that were500 percent larger than the nondrinkers. Since quitting soda is no joke, check out this 28-day plan for breaking a cola habit.

You’re Addicted to Condiments and Toppings

A salad is one of the healthiest meals you can have, but when you top it with bacon bits, goat cheese, nuts, dried fruits, and ranch dressing, you can double the calorie amount in a flash. Be aware of how many calories your favorite salad extras add on. For instance, 10 croutons is an easy 100 calories.

You Don’t Drink Water

Besides keeping you hydrated, drinking water on the regular, according to recent studies, can aid with weight loss. Filling up on water before a meal helps encourage portion control, and eating foods that contain a lot of water (like fruits and veggies) will fill you up faster, causing you to eat less. A small study even found that drinking cool water can speed up metabolism and discourage cravings for sugary drinks like soda and juice. Now, that’s a reason to stay hydrated!

You Don’t Leave Time For Fun

Since stress is shown to cause weight gain by triggering the body to eat more — especially foods high in sugar and fat — make sure you give yourself time to relax and unwind. And it’s an added bonus that so many fun activities (like dancing, hiking, and shopping) are already natural calorie-burners!

You Exercise With an Empty Stomach

If you regularly exercise without eating first, you should reconsider: when you work out on an empty stomach, research shows that the calories burned come from muscle, not fat. Since muscle burns more calories than fat, the more muscle mass you have, the better it is for weight loss. Not only will fueling your body help you avoid losing muscle, but also, you’ll have more energy to push yourself through your workout.

You Only Do Cardio

If you live on the treadmill but never lift a pound, then you’re missing out on one of the most important pieces of the fitness puzzle. Not only does weight training prevent injury by strengthening the joints, but it also builds muscle mass and increases metabolic rate. Bonus: thanks to a revved-up metabolism, you’ll keep burning calories long after you’ve slipped off your sneakers.

You Eat Without Thinking

Aligning mealtime with a screen like your computer or the TV can be hurt your weight-loss goals. Designating a special time for meals without distractions will help you connect to your food and, as a result, eat less. Sometimes you don’t even realize how much you’re scarfing when your mind is somewhere else.

You Don’t Eat Enough

Don’t starve yourself to save calories for later. It’ll not only mess up your metabolism, and by dinnertime, that famished feeling will likely cause you to eat more than you would if you weren’t starving. Not only is starving yourself not sustainable for continued weight loss, but also, limiting yourself to too-small portions can lead to excess snacking between mealtimes.

You Leave Out Entire Food Groups

Giving up entire food groups can lead to a nutritional deficiency — not to mention trigger major cravings for whatever food has been cut. Rather than, say, eliminating all carbohydrates, focus on whole grains and remember to monitor portion control. Usually it’s the extra servings that add to your waistline, not the pasta itself.

You Never Indulge

In an otherwise healthy diet, eating a few french fries or a piece of chocolate cake isn’t going to ruin your weight-loss goals. A study found that it isn’t necessary to up workout intensity the day after a piece of cake and that a daily variance of as much as 600 calories won’t reflect on your waistline, as long as you maintain a healthy diet in the long run.

You Eat the Wrong Post-Workout Snacks

A post-workout snack is just that — a snack. And unless it’s mealtime, what you eat after an average workout should be around 150 calories. Since healthy foods like trail mix can be high in calories, measure out a serving instead of mindlessly chomping straight out of the bag. If you’re looking for some ideas, here are 10 post-workout snacks under 150 calories

Source: Fitsugar

Love this. No bull, just straight facts!

(via run-with-thelions)

Photo
The picture on the left was taken in May 2013. There I weighed about 83kgs (187 lbs), and that’s after losing a few kilograms from December 2012. 

I officially started my journey on January 27th 2014. Through (mostly)healthy eating,  drinking water and strength training I have achieved the results you see on your right(2 March 2014).  I’m nowhere near where I’d like to be but I’m clearly on my way.  Slow and steady wins the race right? 

P.s. I can’t even begin to describe in words the difference in physical, mental and spiritual health between the two pictures. I was honestly a different person.  An unhappier person. Everything I have done to get to today has been worth it.

The picture on the left was taken in May 2013. There I weighed about 83kgs (187 lbs), and that’s after losing a few kilograms from December 2012.

I officially started my journey on January 27th 2014. Through (mostly)healthy eating, drinking water and strength training I have achieved the results you see on your right(2 March 2014). I’m nowhere near where I’d like to be but I’m clearly on my way. Slow and steady wins the race right?

P.s. I can’t even begin to describe in words the difference in physical, mental and spiritual health between the two pictures. I was honestly a different person. An unhappier person. Everything I have done to get to today has been worth it.

Photo
lexlifts:

I am getting many questions about how what I did to transform my backside, and some are even questioning the legitimacy of it. So I figured I’d make a post about it to answer this for everyone who is curious and/or a skeptic!
So, people are commenting on the progress photo of my backside saying things like “oh yeah she squats” or “I’m starting the 30 day squat challenge” others are messaging me and asking how many squats I do per day.I think this desperately needs to be said: Believe it or not, squats are not the end all be all when it comes to training your glutes and legs. That’s right. I said it. There is so much more to training your lower body than standard body weight squats. I’m not saying they don’t help or they aren’t a great exercise for your lower body, but there is much more you can do. 
As always, I’m not a professional and this is just from my OWN experience. This is what I did. What I did most likely not yield the same results for you! This is for informational and educational purposes only. 

Frequently Asked Question #1: What exercise routine did you do/what do you mean by “heavy lifting”?
I would like to add that I am not doing all of these exercises in a single day at the gym. I am currently following DHPT’s program (check his blog out here and also here. He’s a certified PT and has a fantastic free weight loss plan!)  :) So I have a more organized/structured training routine now and I go to the gym 5 days a week. I still do ALL of these exercises and these are the weight/reps I am doing them at currently. Also, a gym is pretty much necessary, or at least some home equipment.
So onto the exercises:

Barbell Hip Thrust (your glutes will be on fire, trust me!):60 lb barbell. 4 sets 10-12 repsBarbell Squats:60 lbs barbell. 3 sets 10-12 reps
Hip abduction machine:12 reps/40 lbs, 12 reps/50 lbs, 12 reps/60 lbs
Hip adduction machine:12 reps/50 lbs, 12 reps/60 lbs, 12 reps/80 lbsHyperextensions: 3 sets of 10 - 25 lb weight plate (it is important to control the weight on this or you will injure your lower back, don’t be flinging up and down rapidly when you’re holding heavy weights.. its a recipe for disaster)
Traveling Lunges20-30 strides each leg. holding two 10 lb dumbbells.*I do a low-ish weight because I have a difficult time holding proper form, lol. :/. 
Wall sit:Two 45 lb weight plate on top of legs, do for 1 minute+ (as long as I can but I always go to 1 minute!)Bulgarian Split Squats (my balance on these are awful, with and without weights so I’m practicing the movement/execution mostly)5-10 on each leg, 7 lb weights. Weighted Sumo SquatsHolding one 50 lb dumbbell, 30 reps.Seated Leg PressWarm up set- 200 lbs. 15 reps3 sets of 10. 350 lbsLeg Press (on sled):2 sets of 12 with a total of four 45 lb weight plates. 2 sets of 10 with a total of six 45 lb weight plates.Seated Leg Curl (good for your hammies!)Two sets of 12 reps/40lbsTwo sets of 10-12 reps/60lbs
Calf extension 3 sets of 15, 90 lbs
*AND recently I began incorporating deadlifts into my routines3 sets of 10, 60 lbs (my weight is quite low, I am practicing on my form currently) :) 

I increase the weight as necessary but I tend to stick to the same amount of repetitions. It is important to increase weight when the weight you are doing is not challenging you anymore. If it doesn’t challenge you it won’t change you ;) 

Frequently Asked Question #2: “What was your diet like? Did you follow any diet plans?”
I make sure to eat just enough, but not too little. Which is super important. I am currently eating a calorie deficit in order to reduce my body fat. I do not follow diet plans nor do I restrict any food, food groups or macronutrients. I stick to the basicS (chicken breasts, vegetables, fruits, nuts, eggs occasional dairy, grains, beans (those particular foods tend to cause bloating with myself so I don’t eat them daily). I choose to eat whatever I want in moderation, whether it be a big hamburger, root beer float or a slice of cheesecake. :) I believe moderation is key, and it is okay to indulge and you should never ever feel guilty for doing so.
I do track my macros/calories most of the time so I can be sure that I am not eating too little which was a problem I encountered when I ate “intuitively”. 


Frequently Asked Question #3: “How long did it take?/”How long did it take to see progress?”
From the before to now it has been about a year. However in the beginning I wasn’t as serious about it as I am now and since I was quite new to fitness and lifting, I was only doing a fraction of those exercises and using the crosstrainer.  Keep in mind that your own progress will always differ from the progress of others. No two bodies are alike.
 
Frequently Asked Question #4: “What did you to do get rid of the cellulite”?
 I believe it was from a combination of reducing my overall body fat, regular exercise (lifting and cardio) and an improvement in my eating habits. I noticed that my cellulite was lessening within a few months of going to the gym and eating healthier foods, and I had lost about 15-20lbs.
 Again, this may or may not work for you. Not everyone will experience the same results  Some people are more prone to having cellulite than others, it could be a genetic thing, or even hormonal. 

Frequently Asked Question #5: How can I increase the SIZE of my butt?
Increasing the size means building your gluteus muscles through a calorie surplus/proper nutrition and a lot of lifting. Which means you need to be eating more than your body requires to maintain its current weight, yes, that means you will be gaining. So if you’re like me and still want to reduce your body fat percentage, you might to want to hold off until you’ve reached your bf% goal before you start a calorie surplus again. Someone who has done this and grew themselves a fantastic booty is fitnessforlife3.tumblr.com (I’m sure you’ve seen the before and after of her butt which has made its rounds on the fitblr community a few times).


I think that about covers most of the questions I’ve been getting. :) If there is anything you need explained or have another question entirely just drop it in my inbox and I’ll reply as soon as I can!

lexlifts:

I am getting many questions about how what I did to transform my backside, and some are even questioning the legitimacy of it. So I figured I’d make a post about it to answer this for everyone who is curious and/or a skeptic!

So, people are commenting on the progress photo of my backside saying things like “oh yeah she squats” or “I’m starting the 30 day squat challenge” others are messaging me and asking how many squats I do per day.
I think this desperately needs to be said: Believe it or not, squats are not the end all be all when it comes to training your glutes and legs. That’s right. I said it. There is so much more to training your lower body than standard body weight squats. I’m not saying they don’t help or they aren’t a great exercise for your lower body, but there is much more you can do.

As always, I’m not a professional and this is just from my OWN experience. This is what I did. What I did most likely not yield the same results for you! This is for informational and educational purposes only.

  • Frequently Asked Question #1: What exercise routine did you do/what do you mean by “heavy lifting”?

I would like to add that I am not doing all of these exercises in a single day at the gym. I am currently following DHPT’s program (check his blog out here and also here. He’s a certified PT and has a fantastic free weight loss plan!) :) So I have a more organized/structured training routine now and I go to the gym 5 days a week. I still do ALL of these exercises and these are the weight/reps I am doing them at currently. Also, a gym is pretty much necessary, or at least some home equipment.

So onto the exercises:

Barbell Hip Thrust (your glutes will be on fire, trust me!):
60 lb barbell. 4 sets 10-12 reps

Barbell Squats:
60 lbs barbell. 3 sets 10-12 reps

Hip abduction machine:
12 reps/40 lbs, 12 reps/50 lbs, 12 reps/60 lbs

Hip adduction machine:
12 reps/50 lbs, 12 reps/60 lbs, 12 reps/80 lbs

Hyperextensions:
3 sets of 10 - 25 lb weight plate (it is important to control the weight on this or you will injure your lower back, don’t be flinging up and down rapidly when you’re holding heavy weights.. its a recipe for disaster)

Traveling Lunges
20-30 strides each leg. holding two 10 lb dumbbells.
*I do a low-ish weight because I have a difficult time holding proper form, lol. :/.

Wall sit:
Two 45 lb weight plate on top of legs, do for 1 minute+ (as long as I can but I always go to 1 minute!)

Bulgarian Split Squats (my balance on these are awful, with and without weights so I’m practicing the movement/execution mostly)
5-10 on each leg, 7 lb weights.

Weighted Sumo Squats
Holding one 50 lb dumbbell, 30 reps.

Seated Leg Press
Warm up set- 200 lbs. 15 reps
3 sets of 10. 350 lbs

Leg Press (on sled):
2 sets of 12 with a total of four 45 lb weight plates.
2 sets of 10 with a total of six 45 lb weight plates.

Seated Leg Curl (good for your hammies!)
Two sets of 12 reps/40lbs
Two sets of 10-12 reps/60lbs

Calf extension
3 sets of 15, 90 lbs

*AND recently I began incorporating deadlifts into my routines
3 sets of 10, 60 lbs (my weight is quite low, I am practicing on my form currently) :)

I increase the weight as necessary but I tend to stick to the same amount of repetitions. It is important to increase weight when the weight you are doing is not challenging you anymore. If it doesn’t challenge you it won’t change you ;)

  • Frequently Asked Question #2: “What was your diet like? Did you follow any diet plans?”

I make sure to eat just enough, but not too little. Which is super important. I am currently eating a calorie deficit in order to reduce my body fat. I do not follow diet plans nor do I restrict any food, food groups or macronutrients. I stick to the basicS (chicken breasts, vegetables, fruits, nuts, eggs occasional dairy, grains, beans (those particular foods tend to cause bloating with myself so I don’t eat them daily). I choose to eat whatever I want in moderation, whether it be a big hamburger, root beer float or a slice of cheesecake. :) I believe moderation is key, and it is okay to indulge and you should never ever feel guilty for doing so.

I do track my macros/calories most of the time so I can be sure that I am not eating too little which was a problem I encountered when I ate “intuitively”.

  • Frequently Asked Question #3: “How long did it take?/”How long did it take to see progress?”

From the before to now it has been about a year. However in the beginning I wasn’t as serious about it as I am now and since I was quite new to fitness and lifting, I was only doing a fraction of those exercises and using the crosstrainer.

Keep in mind that your own progress will always differ from the progress of others. No two bodies are alike.

  • Frequently Asked Question #4: “What did you to do get rid of the cellulite”?

I believe it was from a combination of reducing my overall body fat, regular exercise (lifting and cardio) and an improvement in my eating habits. I noticed that my cellulite was lessening within a few months of going to the gym and eating healthier foods, and I had lost about 15-20lbs.

Again, this may or may not work for you. Not everyone will experience the same results Some people are more prone to having cellulite than others, it could be a genetic thing, or even hormonal.

  • Frequently Asked Question #5: How can I increase the SIZE of my butt?

Increasing the size means building your gluteus muscles through a calorie surplus/proper nutrition and a lot of lifting. Which means you need to be eating more than your body requires to maintain its current weight, yes, that means you will be gaining. So if you’re like me and still want to reduce your body fat percentage, you might to want to hold off until you’ve reached your bf% goal before you start a calorie surplus again. Someone who has done this and grew themselves a fantastic booty is fitnessforlife3.tumblr.com (I’m sure you’ve seen the before and after of her butt which has made its rounds on the fitblr community a few times).

I think that about covers most of the questions I’ve been getting. :) If there is anything you need explained or have another question entirely just drop it in my inbox and I’ll reply as soon as I can!

(Source: keep-calm-stay-healthy)

Quote
"Dont think about what can happen in a month. Dont think about what can happen in a year. Just focus on the 24 hours in front of you and do what you can to get closer to where you want to be!"

— Eric Thomas (via natural-lifters)

(via beforeandafterfatlosspics)

Text

Falling in love with myself again. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that I can now deadlift 30kg.

Text

dear-monday:

Repeat after me: I am a goddess. My spirit is towering, my soul is mighty, my breasts are magnificent and my shoes are super fucking cute.

(via wh3ntimestoodstill)

Photo
thefitty:

Goes to show that size doesn’t dictate your fitness; so stop judging.

thefitty:

Goes to show that size doesn’t dictate your fitness; so stop judging.

(Source: , via wh3ntimestoodstill)